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Echoes and Mirrors» Blog Archive » My Google Reader is Better than Yours

My Google Reader is Better than Yours

… because I read an amazing essay up at Clockwise Cat that’s not up yet:
Dharmic Dimensions in The English Patient by Allison Ross:

“The English Patient,” the award-garnering 1996 movie based on the novel by the same name, is one of those hypnotizing, multi-layered gems that humble the viewer into lauding the very creation of films. The movie, set near the end of Wolrd War II, concerns a charred plane crash victim who nostalgically narrates to his nurse the tale of his fateful romance with a married woman. The film style invokes the golden era of movies, with its sweeping scenery, quixotic reliance on romance, and intimately drawn characters.

But the film also has a less discernible dimension. As I see it, “The English Patient” is literally suffused with Buddhist themes. Whether this was intentional is unclear, but I don’t think any observant viewer can deny the movie’s intrinsically spiritual milieu.

The book also radiated some patently Buddhism themes, and so I was glad to see it carried over into the movie incarnation. In the book, specifically what struck me was the Indian character Kip’s Zen-like meticulousness in defusing bombs. This is not as tangible in the film, but you do see a certain Zen-esque serenity in Kip’s manner. Of course, Kip is a Sikh, a religion which mingles mystical Hindu and Islamic qualities.

I’m only going to give that teaser. It’s probably blogspot being overly friendly for some unknown reason and leaking content from the next issue, due out next month.

If you don’t read Clockwise Cat, you need to. Allison Ross has some amazing work up over there and somehow I end up reading half of it early. So I will take this opportunity to provide some (albeit marginal) publicity.

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