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Echoes and Mirrors» Blog Archive » Again, fatties

Again, fatties

I didn’t try to make fun before, but it may have felt like it. I still am not, just making observations. Also, fat is not really attractive. On to my first order of business:

IT MAY be time to hide the cookie jar. Over 26% of Americans are obese, with a weight to height ratio (or body mass index) of over 30, according to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, a government body. Over the past ten years, waistlines have expanded in every state. In 1998 most states had a relatively trim population, with fewer than a fifth of adults obese. But since then the scales have tipped in the other direction. Now at least a quarter of adults in 32 states are obese. Mississippi is the fattest of all, with a third of its residents considered obese.

Trust me and click the link: the graph is essential! If you really want the full effect, read the comments about this at Drudge. Sometimes comments on the internet make my hair stand on end.

Now for the parts that will offend those who don’t understand it. They are also probably fat. From Erik J. Barzeski, Fat People = Poor People: (the comments here are worth their weight in gold)

There’s an interesting article at Salon that talks about how the fatter segment of the US population is also the poorer population. I sometimes wonder how stereotypes come about, and I often postulate that they come about because they are, for the most part, true (except for the blonde stereotype).

So it strikes me that poorer people tend to be:

  • Less well educated
  • Less active
  • More likely to drink beer and fast food

Yep, pretty much the same qualities a fat person would expect.

This blog (and related article) are from from about the half-way mark between 1998 and 2008. I’m going to surmise that there is probably a directly proportional relation to economic decline.

If you are smart or attractive, you’ll probably rise into a higher economic class. Yes, this is a societal form of natural selection. Go ahead and drive through some truly poor neighborhoods sometime; tell me how many really attractive people you see there. Count the number of overweight and ugly people you see. If they were smart, they would move up (regardless of education). Being smart does not necessarily mean you understand Plato’s Republic – IQ tests rely heavily on testing pattern recognition and abstract concepts at a certain speed rather than rote memorization.

Also, keep in mind that this is a macro-generalization and that there is an acceptable percentage of exceptions to the rule. There are plenty of fat people with money. There are plenty of smart people who are fat.

The Salon article Erik mentioned above is a book review for “Fat Land”.

The association of fat with a lower social status is probably intuitive for most Americans, but so far that’s mostly been treated as a cruel stereotype of the overweight, representatives of whom have gone on TV talk shows to tearfully protest that they are not “lazy” or “low class.” The innovation Critser brings to the literature of obesity is to take what turns out to be a valid perception after all — working-class and underclass people are more likely to be fat — and pull a switcheroo. Rather than regard class status as a stigma unfairly affixed to fat people, he presents fat as a heath liability unjustly foisted on the poor and insufficiently addressed by the affluent.

Ah, the eternally vicimized fatties.

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