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Echoes and Mirrors» Blog Archive » Jane Austin and my Stupid Brain – Part 1

Jane Austin and my Stupid Brain – Part 1

Upon further reading of Jane Austin’s Emma, I’ve taken to it a bit more than I thought I would. It is quite worthy as literature, although the actual text itself is a bit stuffy – and insufferably long-winded. But it does avail itself to insight on perspective. Specifically, it reaches deep into the psyche of the female mind -but not the mind of any female: it is the mind of a hottie female (to be blunt). I think one could glean much about how an 8 or a 9 thinks in regards to social standing, pairing, dating etc.

Paying close attention to how she regards the available male characters (or rather, those who are suitable mates, married or otherwise) and her female competition, it’s quite easy to regard her as a very pretty, very charming cunt. And even halfway through, it is clear to see how she disdains betas (Mr. Elton) and females of (from her perspective) equal value (Jane Fairfax). Jane has a similar disposition towards Emma as well, though, it seems.

Her admiration for Mr. Knightly, is equally identifiable – and the subtext leads to the conclusion that he is admired not because of his wealth (which it is made clear is the only one larger than her own family’s) but because he does not attempt to flatter her every whim. He calls her out on being petty, makes sideways compliments and is otherwise aloof.

I don’t mean to forge an in-depth critique of Jane Austin in terms of sociobiology or game here so hastily (nor without citations, heavens no!) but I believe this will be a cornerstone of my research paper for my Literary Criticism course.

While Emma takes place in the 18th century, the human (specifically, the female) psyche hasn’t changed that much in 200 years whereas research into psychology, biomechanics and sexual behavior has. And there is much to be learned from a work that is open about it without being scared of pissing off feminists (and was written by a woman). That is, I could draw very similar conclusions from Norman Mailer or Henry Miller, two guys who defied feminism and have been coldly labeled misogynists by the feminist crowd.

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