Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): No such file or directory in /home/scouser/echoesandmirrors.com/wp-content/plugins/statpress/statpress.php on line 1191

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/scouser/echoesandmirrors.com/wp-content/plugins/statpress/statpress.php on line 1191

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): No such file or directory in /home/scouser/echoesandmirrors.com/wp-content/plugins/statpress/statpress.php on line 1194

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/scouser/echoesandmirrors.com/wp-content/plugins/statpress/statpress.php on line 1194

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): No such file or directory in /home/scouser/echoesandmirrors.com/wp-content/plugins/statpress/statpress.php on line 1197

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/scouser/echoesandmirrors.com/wp-content/plugins/statpress/statpress.php on line 1197
Echoes and Mirrors» Blog Archive » Wittgenstein & Me: A Love Story, Part III

Wittgenstein & Me: A Love Story, Part III

The Picture Theory of Meaning, Part Deux

Propositions picture states of affairs.

If the given states of affairs are true it is a fact, otherwise it is a possible fact. The expression of a proposition is mapped out in the same logical form as the fact (states of affairs) itself, but is a mapping of names rather than the objects (which constitute the fact). This is a shared (mirrored) logical form. It cannot be pictured; only shown. (I’ll come back to this shortly, it seems to raise a bit of a problem for me.)

But this expression, a thought, is also a fact, composed of objects. But they are merely representative of another fact: a picture of some real thing.

A proposition doesn’t contain meaning in itself, but points at the meaning (it has sense, or direction) by mimicking the fact.

A recipe is a like a sentence, or a thought.

The act of cooking is akin to thinking.

Cooking a specific recipe (a propositional sign) creates the proposition.

This mental food is a picture of a real fact. (Or, the fact that the potatoes are mixed with gravy, for instance (Or that fact that aRb (a is related to b by relation R)).)

The origins of these “states of affairs” is troubling. It seems to be empirically evident that objects must necessarily exist, but that states of affairs are somewhat assumed to exist. What if they don’t? This sort of dashes the logical atomism. It is the bricks which which facts are built. Without states of affairs, facts are also assumptions; a propositional sign can no longer project a proposition because the fact it senses is in dubious danger of being non-existent.

I may be walking down the entirely wrong track here. I digress.

“As we know, Wittgenstein did not believe that words were necessary for thought; however, if a thought is a proposition (with sense), then are there wordless propositions?”

Err, This appears to be somewhat of a chicken before the egg problem. A proposition can be wordless, but in order for it to become so, it must first be a projected propositional sign. Yes, this seems to be somewhat sensible, if a thought contains its own sense (propositions only contain the possibility of its sense, if I’m not straying too far from the logic Wittgenstein has laid out).

There must be some sort of mechanism for this transformation, that imbues the thought with this. Through this mechanism, thoughts are facts, and the world is facts but only one is real. Some sort of mysterious transformation has occurred via thinking.

But that seems to be an a priori assumption. I’m not going to step on that land mind just yet.

Understanding: Stupid hobbitses, tricksy hobbitses, always keeping it from us… yes, my proposition! We wants it!

Share

Tags:

0 comments